Palais des Beaux Arts de Lille – Museum of Fine Arts, Lille

Posted: September 24th, 2012 | Author: Kathryn | Filed under: museum or gallery, travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

Last week we popped into the Palais des Beaux Arts in Lille, not being an exhaustive museum it only took us a couple of hours to see all of the rooms. The building is beautiful, grand and majestic. You feel closer to the walls in this museum when compared to other, more laden galleries. It can at times feel more as if you have entered a palace with a large collection of art rather than a building holding so much art that you don’t notice it at all. There is plenty of space so you can walk freely through the rooms and have a small sense of what the building would have been like when in private use.

These are the things that I saw that stood out this time. The light was just right in the marble room, just right!

Ernest-Eugéne Hiolle, Narcisse, 1868;

Alfred Agache, Etude de vieille femme, 1880;

Antoine Vollon (1833-1900), Vase de fleurs;

Antoine Vollon (1833-1900), Vase de fleurs, detail;

Emile Bernard, Aprés le bain, les nymphes, 1908;

Carolus-Duran born charles Emile Auguste Durant, L’Homme endormi, 1861;

Augustin-Théodule Ribot, Saint Vincent, 1860;

Augustin-Théodule Ribot, Saint Vincent, 1860, close;

A section of floor in the Palais des Beaux Arts de Lille;


Lille métropole musée d’art moderne – LaM – Lille metropolitan museum of modern art

Posted: September 20th, 2012 | Author: Kathryn | Filed under: museum or gallery, travel | Tags: , , , , , | No Comments »

Over the weekend my husband and I visited LaM – Lille metropolitan museum of modern art, a wonderful , bright, relaxed gallery with a wealth of hidden treasures. The gallery has a number of works from the most notable artists of the modern movement including Modigliani, Léger and of course Picasso. They have a room dedicated to cubism and large areas dedicated to Art Brut, housing some extremely unique pieces by local artists including the extraordinarily detailed work of Augustin Lesage (from the towns of Auchel and Burbure, Pas-de-Calais) and Victor Simon (from the town of Bruay-la-Buissiére and the city of Arras, Pas-de-Calais).

These are a few of my favourite pieces.

Amedeo Modigliani, Portrait de Roger Dutilleul, 1919:

Amedeo Modigliani, Portrait de Roger Dutilleul, 1919

Amedeo Modigliani, Nu assis a la chemise, 1917:

Amedeo Modigliani, Maternité, 1919:

Fernand Léger, Esquisse pour l’homme au chien, 1920;

Fernand Léger, Femme au bouquet, 1924:

Kees van Dongen, Femme Lippue, 1909;

Kees van Dongen, Femme Lippue, 1909, detail;

Kees van Dongen, Femme Lippue, 1909, detail;

Unknown artist;

Sonia Terk-Delaunay, Bord de l’eau – Finland, 1906 detail;

André Masson, Au Cabaret, 1923;

Joan Miro, Peinture, 1927;

Jean Dubuffet, Déploiement aux trois arbres, 1969;

Séraphine Louis, Bouquet de fleurs;

Augustin Lesage, L’Espirit de la pyramide, 1926;

Augustin Lesage, L’Espirit de la pyramide, 1926, detail;

Augustin Lesage, L’Espirit de la pyramide, 1926, detail;

Victor Simon, Le toile bleue, mai 1943 – octobre 1944;

Victor Simon, Le toile bleue, mai 1943 – octobre 1944, detail;

Victor Simon, Le toile bleue, mai 1943 – octobre 1944, detail;

Victor Simon, Le toile bleue, mai 1943 – octobre 1944, detail;


Τσάι του βουνού – Greek ‘Shepherds Tea’

Posted: September 18th, 2012 | Author: Kathryn | Filed under: cooking, garden | Tags: , , , , | No Comments »

Τσάι του βουνού, Greek 'Shepard's tea'

I lived in Greece for just over four years. I learnt to cook there … and learnt to eat there! Food is celebrated by wild and wonderful get-togethers, dinners and parties. Bakeries, patisseries and sweet shops have some of the most unique and truly pleasurable indulgences which are, without a doubt,  labours of love in preparation and process. My time in Greece certainly taught me the art of soul food and the value of using good, fresh, and wherever possible, organic ingredients. But amongst all of the rich food experiences I had during my time, there is one thing that stands out above the rest, one thing that has imprinted heavily upon my senses. It is the modest plant called Ironwort. Τσάι του βουνού (tsai tou vounou), is a tisane, a herbal tea brewed from the flowers and stems of the plant Sideritis (aka Ironwort). It grows wild upon the mountains of Greece and for hundreds of years been brewed by shepherds on the hills and cliffs of Greece’s ancient and glorious landscape. To me the scent embodies ‘nurture’. It is intoxicating. Traditionally thought to have magical powers, Sideritis has been used to treat all number of common ailments including cold, flu, sinus, fever and allergies. Today it is additionally known to function as both an anti-inflammatory and an anti-microbial. While current research is being carried out into the plant’s ability to aid in the prevention of cancer, osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s. I am going to try growing it next season, I would certainly enjoy a year round supply!

Τσάι του βουνού, Greek 'Shepard's tea'


Château de Chantilly

Posted: September 17th, 2012 | Author: Kathryn | Filed under: travel | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

Early in the Summer I took a very quick trip to Chantilly. Unfortunately I didn’t get to do a complete visit and literally went from the front gate to the gift shop and then took a quick ride around the gardens. These images are far from a thorough view but I’ll be heading back to do the complete tour soon and will re-post then. The buildings are not as they were originally intended, it was set upon without mercy during the French revolution and destroyed then re-built during the 1870s to a fairly unhappy chorus of critics. It has impressive, tranquil grounds, including its very own family of kangaroos, which (if I have my facts in order) are the living descendants of the original kangaroo family, imported a very long time ago from Australia.  Being only a short distance from Charles de Gaulle, the Château de Chantilly is a lovely first stop and welcome to arriving guests!

The decorative anti-siege security system over the moat.

The view from the gift shop, it is a beautiful room and so romantic!

Exiting the gift shop:

I have a vague impression that the Chateau was used as a country lodge of sorts, there are quite a few animal sculptures around that make me think it so, a strong rural theme!

A modest garden when compared to that of the Château de Villandry but extremely tranquil, many many birds.