Manufacture des Flandres – Musée du Jacquard – Jacquard Museum

Posted: October 29th, 2012 | Author: Kathryn | Filed under: museum or gallery, travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

Jacquard card puncher

For me, this place is simply awesome. The Musée du Jacquard in Roubaix, Northern France, is an exceptionally comprehensive museum. There were three of us in our mini tour group and we had our own guide who although not a weaver herself was wonderfully personable, knowledgeable and technically proficient in the use of the machines. The remarkable point of interest of this museum is that all of the looms are in working order and each loom is turned on and operated before your very eyes. The looms are arranged in chronological order so that you can also see the development of the Jacquard loom and the implementation of technology over the centuries. You start your tour with a short introduction to fibre, move onto earlier, simpler looms and work your way through to modern mechanised machines with rapier attachments, automated cutting and full width repeats.

The museum is situated in an old mill in Roubaix. This town has a very long and tumultuous history. Spanning several hundred years the turn of events has been extraordinary: multiple wars, occupation, abolition, fierce, fierce local competition with Lille, and an astounding population growth that rivaled most cities and towns in the rest of Europe. This museum is not to be missed if you are ‘into’ textiles or have an interest in industrial history. The sound of these looms throwing the weft thread, beating the cloth and changing the shafts is invigorating. It is an impressive collection and I’m thrilled that they are maintaining the looms and the history of Jacquard development.

The Jacquard loom was invented by Joseph Marie Jacquard in 1801, the invention is the process and mechanised attachment that controls the loom. It made possible the process of weaving complex patterned cloth like damask and brocade. On a Jacquard loom there are hundreds and thousands of hooks that are attached to strings that hang from the overhead jacquard attachment. Early on, one hook held a number of warp ends (threads) resulting in a number of repeats across the width of the cloth. As technology improved they were able to have a single warp end per hook which resulted in an unrepeated image from selvedge to selvedge. A series of punched cards control these hooks by telling the mechanical head which hooks to lift or lower. Due to the sheer number of warp threads running through the loom it was very difficult to thread the loom but with the new card system, it only needed to be threaded once. If a different pattern was desired, the pattern cards were changed. When the warp ran out or a different coloured warp was required, the new threads were simply tied onto the threads already running through the loom. The invention of Jacquard dramatically increased the creative possibilities for decorative design.

If you are unfamiliar with traditional weaving, and would like to read on please see the Wikipedia entry on weaving and Jacquard weaving.

This post is very long with many images but I thought it best to include all of the photos for those of you who have a deep passion for textiles and weaving. Enjoy!

A partial view of the museum, an early Jacquard loom in the centre. Made of mostly wood with some metal parts it represents true textile innovation:

Jacquard loom

Beautifully shaped moving metal parts on a warper (a large devise used for measuring and applying even tension to the warp):

warper

Jacquard loom

A pattern card puncher. This machine is beautiful:

Jacquard pattern card puncher

A pattern card, each row represents one line in the pattern. Many cards are stitched together to create the full repeat:

Jacquard pattern card

The complicated pattern card punching machine:

Jacquard card puncher

The punched patterns, hundreds of these cards are needed to weave each textile pattern:

Jacquard pattern card puncher

Jacquard pattern card puncher

Jacquard pattern card puncher

A dobby loom, well worked over the centuries:

dobby loom

Details of the dobby loom:

dobby loom

A Jacquard loom:

Jacquard loom

A Jacquard loom:

Jacquard loom

A Jacquard loom:

Jacquard pattern card puncher

Cloth detail from loom:

cloth woven on Jacquard loom

A shuttle-less rapier loom, an alternate method for weaving the weft thread. The rapier system can be used on both Jacquard and dobby looms:

rapier loom

A Jacquard loom:

Jacquard loom

An extremely complex band or ribbon loom operated by a Jacquard attachment. An incredible machine, breathtaking:

Jacquard ribbon band loom

Jacquard ribbon band loom

Each ribbon or band can have a different coloured warp and multiple coloured weft threads but with the same pattern. This loom can weave 12 ribbons simultaneously:

Jacquard ribbon band loom

Jacquard ribbon band loom

Jacquard ribbon band loom

A pile rug on a vertical tapestry loom:

pile rug on vertical tapestry loom

A unique tapestry loom with different types of tapestry and pile carpets on show:

tapestry loom


La Fête de la Dinde à Licques

Posted: December 16th, 2011 | Author: Kathryn | Filed under: events | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

turkeys at Licques

We are five days away from the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year. As a result the sun doesn’t come up until 9h00 and is down by 17h00, so getting up on Sunday for the Fête de la Dinde in Licques was somewhat of a challenge. But it was worth it.

Every year the town of Licques holds a festival in honour of the turkey. A hundred or so turkeys are paraded along the main street of the village followed by the town dignitaries. I had the camera set on a high ISO in anticipation of a fast and active turkey dash but it ended up being a very slow and stagnant move through the crowd. The turkeys did little more than amble, quite comfortable with all of the attention and un-miffed by the hundreds of people that had come to watch.

The town is famous for its traditionally reared organic turkey and has been celebrating this event since the 17th century. I was moved to find that they have celebrated this event for such a long time. The town continues to show enduring adoration and appreciation for an animal that has provided, I imagine, many local jobs and much financial security for the town.

As part of the festivities there was also a brilliant food producers market. There were wines, cheeses, a variety of milks and icecreams, honey, fresh, cured and conserved meats and of course … fresh turkey.

more turkeys at Licques

turkey neck and feathers

stone turkey statue and Licquoise cauldron over wood fire

In the main square there is a stone statue of a turkey showing just how important this bird is to the towns people. Behind it, just for this special day was a gigantic cauldron brewing the town’s famed liqueur ‘Licquoise’. Unfortunately I was completely engaged with ‘chasing’ the ambling turkeys that I missed the drinking of the contents of the cauldron … fortunately there’s always next year!

wood fired bread. pain cuit au feu de bois

cheddar au whiskey. gouda de Noel. cheddar fermier.

gourmet cheeses

bottled beans