Roulez Carrosses – The carriages of the Château de Versailles

Posted: October 9th, 2012 | Author: Kathryn | Filed under: museum or gallery, travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

On show at the Museum of fine arts in Arras until the 10th of November 2013 is a outstanding exhibition of the carriages and coaches of the Royal court of the Chateau of Versailles. Ten years ago, the carriage museum at Versailles (Musée des Carrosses de Versailles) was closed to the public with this occasion being the first that the royal coaches of Versailles have been loaned out for exhibition. There are only seven coaches on display but they are exquisite examples of the wealth and craftsmanship invested in these opulent vehicles. Used for a number of royal occasions, coronations, marriages, christenings and funerals, they would have been a marvelous site to see on route. Charles the 10th’s extraordinary coronation vehicle is covered entirely in gold. Rich, opulent and splendid it is a breathtaking experience walking into the room that houses it. And the funeral coach of Louis 18th would have been an overwhelming sight, a huge black and ominous carriage carrying the coffin and body of the King, laden with silk and gold drawn by eight heavily ornamented black horses.

Accompanying the coaches there are a number of wonderful works of art and a sensational collection of sleds. Sledding was introduced to the Versailles court in the late 17th Century, a past time inspired by Nordic Royals. Members of the court would race around the Grand canal, iced over during the winter or on the roads and paths covered with snow in the garden and park of Versailles. I loved the floor to ceiling photographic/artwork installations used to illustrate the mood throughout the exhibition. I’ve seen this technique used quite extensively throughout France and Belgium and it always works very well.

A very good film in the final room, also on a grand scale with the screen running floor to ceiling, documents the evolution of carriage suspension in a constant effort to solve issues of comfort, going far beyond padded and sprung interior furniture, paving the way for modern vehicles.

It is a unique experience to see these carriages and one that I suspect may not come around too often. This exhibition is in fact the first exhibition of its kind ever in France. In a National effort to revitalise the North of France and decentralise culture, the Roulez Carrosses is a wonderful opportunity that you shouldn’t miss if you are traveling near by. If not, I hope that you enjoy the photographs that I have taken and that they give you a good sense of this brilliant exhibition.

A striking sculpture by Xavier Veilhan at the entry to the Museum of fine arts in Arras:

Roulez Carrosses

There are four halls in the palace, running every side of the enclosed courtyard The still and empty halls gives one a lovely opportunity to imagine those who’ve wandered these floors in the past, how they dressed and how they would ponder and reflect as the walked the long distances around the palace:

Museum of fine arts, Arras

The immaculate courtyard, I don’t think that I noticed a door along the halls but there must have been:

Museum of fine arts, Arras

This coach belonged to the 8 year old son of Louis 16th and Marie-Antoinette, it is miniature in comparison to the other coaches on display;

Roulez Carrosses coach belonging to son of Louis 16th and Marie-Antoinette

A Sedan chair:

Roulez Carrosses Versailles sedan chair

Towards the end of the seventeenth century the court of Versailles adopted the Nordic pastime of sled racing:

Roulez Carrosses Versailles sleds

Roulez Carrosses Versailles sled

A magical leopard sled, carved in about 1730:

Roulez Carrosses leopard sled

Roulez Carrosses leopard sled

Roulez Carrosses leopard sled

Roulez Carrosses

A coach built for the marriage of Napoleon 1st and Marie-Louise, 1810:

Roulez Carrosses

The coach used for the baptism of the Duke of Bordeaux in 1821:

Roulez Carrosses

The coach of the coronation of Charles the 10th, drawn by eight horses:

Roulez Carrosses coach coronation charles 10th

Roulez Carrosses coach coronation charles 10th

Roulez Carrosses coach coronation charles 10th

Roulez Carrosses coach coronation charles 10th

Roulez Carrosses coach coronation charles 10th

Roulez Carrosses coach coronation charles 10th

Roulez Carrosses coach coronation charles 10th

Roulez Carrosses coach coronation charles 10th

The only preserved Royal hearse in France, it is the funeral coach of Louis the 18th:

Roulez Carrosses coach of Louis 18th

Roulez Carrosses coach of Louis 18th

Roulez Carrosses coach of Louis 18th

A coach built in the 1880s by Ehrler, a famous Parisian coach builder, designed for comfort it has an eight-spring suspension system:

Roulez Carrosses coach designed by Ehrler

Roulez Carrosses coach wheels


La Fête de la Dinde à Licques

Posted: December 16th, 2011 | Author: Kathryn | Filed under: events | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | No Comments »

turkeys at Licques

We are five days away from the Winter Solstice, the shortest day of the year. As a result the sun doesn’t come up until 9h00 and is down by 17h00, so getting up on Sunday for the Fête de la Dinde in Licques was somewhat of a challenge. But it was worth it.

Every year the town of Licques holds a festival in honour of the turkey. A hundred or so turkeys are paraded along the main street of the village followed by the town dignitaries. I had the camera set on a high ISO in anticipation of a fast and active turkey dash but it ended up being a very slow and stagnant move through the crowd. The turkeys did little more than amble, quite comfortable with all of the attention and un-miffed by the hundreds of people that had come to watch.

The town is famous for its traditionally reared organic turkey and has been celebrating this event since the 17th century. I was moved to find that they have celebrated this event for such a long time. The town continues to show enduring adoration and appreciation for an animal that has provided, I imagine, many local jobs and much financial security for the town.

As part of the festivities there was also a brilliant food producers market. There were wines, cheeses, a variety of milks and icecreams, honey, fresh, cured and conserved meats and of course … fresh turkey.

more turkeys at Licques

turkey neck and feathers

stone turkey statue and Licquoise cauldron over wood fire

In the main square there is a stone statue of a turkey showing just how important this bird is to the towns people. Behind it, just for this special day was a gigantic cauldron brewing the town’s famed liqueur ‘Licquoise’. Unfortunately I was completely engaged with ‘chasing’ the ambling turkeys that I missed the drinking of the contents of the cauldron … fortunately there’s always next year!

wood fired bread. pain cuit au feu de bois

cheddar au whiskey. gouda de Noel. cheddar fermier.

gourmet cheeses

bottled beans


street flowers in Aire-sur-la-Lys.

Posted: September 15th, 2011 | Author: Kathryn | Filed under: garden | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment »

The village of Aire-sur-la-Lys is where we do our grocery shopping, use the post office, get a kebab, those sorts of things. Like most French villages around France the local commune does a wonderful job of placing flowers around the place and effortlessly maintaining them through the growing season. Usually the pots that are permanently placed along the streets are rectangular or square but in Aire sur la Lys, they have installed very high pots of flowers above the footpath. They last significantly longer than the street level planters because they don’t get attacked by playful children and they get a great deal more light up high. Some of these pots have been mounted, hanging from the facade of buildings and they look really wonderful, beautiful balls of flowers that bring loads of colour to the street.